WFV North Cave Wetlands YWT Reserve East Yorkshire 18th September 2018

LakeLakeOur Bees trip today was to a familiar haunt for our group- North Cave Wetlands. The weather was unpromising when we departed from the Unitarian church in Bradford, dull with some drizzle however it brightened up on our arrival and our day ended in sunshine. We were aware of the ever present breezes on the reserve but they did not cause any problems more especially for our journey home. Birds, butterflies, dragonflies, hedgerows with berries and late flowering plants were our menu for the day as we did a walk along the perimeter path of the reserve. The visit was between seasons and definitely had an autumn twist. Birds are variously on their migration path.

 Birds- the main subject of interest were the Kestrels. Our group spent some considerable time observing them in flight, hovering above potential prey and then swiftly descending for the catch, their brilliant auburn-brown backs shinning in the sunlight. The lakes were noticeably lacking in water as a result of drought conditions of summer. There was a presence of Greylag Geese in good numbers, also ducks including Teal, Gadwall, Tufted duck, Pintail, Pochard and Wigeon. Great and Little Grebe were seen as well as Heron, Cormorant, Little Egret, Mute Swan and it's Australian relative the Black Swan. However waders were seen in limited numbers including Snipe, Little Ringed Plover, Lapwing and Ruff.

Butterflies - a variety of butterflies were seen including Speckled Wood,(dancing along the rides), Small White, Comma, Small Copper, Red Admiral and Wall.

Dragonflies- were seen busy patrolling the perimeter paths and around the dragonfly ponds. They included Migrant Hawker and Common Darter dragonflies.

Hedgerows and flowers- the hedgerows were fully laden with berries of Dogwood, Hawthorn, Buckthorn and Rowan. No doubt they will be stripped as winter descends. However the Blackberries were seen to have suffered from the drought. They were not as round or delicious as the ones at Arnside. Of the 70 flowers recorded by Alice 75% were in flower the rest in fruit. Notable plants were Common Fleabane, Viper's-bugloss, Mignonette also the pinks- Stork's-bill, Field Bindweed, Common Centaury and Mallow( seen in single numbers). The undoubted highlight of the day ( apart from Barbara's trousers seen at ground level) was the Grass Snake spotted by Sally swimming along the margin of the Main Lake from the overlooking hide. John has confirmed it's identity.

This field visit was attended by 10 people and for several it was their first visit to this popular reserve. Thanks go to our drivers Sue and Kevin and also to Alice and Margaret for planning our day. So sad to say "good bye " to summer. Margaret

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